You are here

Cancer

Prof. Lea Eisenbach
11.03.2015

Combining two innovative treatments might help keep cancer from spreading

(l-r) bottom: Tamar Gross, Prof. Lea Eisenbach, Dr. Esther Tzehoval and Zoya Alteber; middle row: David Bassan and Adi Sharbi-Yunger; top row: Lior Roitman, Mareike Grees and Adam Solomon
11.02.2015

New strategies might help the immune system outwit cancer cells

NPM1 interacts with DNA polymerase eta and regulates polymerase eta-promoted TLS. Assay of polymerase eta and NPM1 in unirradiated (l) and ultraviolet irradiated cells ((c) after one hour, (r) after 18 hours). Blue: DNA in the nucleus; green: polymerase eta–NPM1 interaction
29.12.2014

A mechanism for keeping DNA repair mistakes to a minimum might advance the development of cancer drugs

 

receptors day and night
06.10.2014

Weizmann Institute scientists reveal that a hormone that keeps us alert also suppresses the spread of cancer

Mapping cell death: The protein-protein interactions discovered and mapped out in Prof. Adi Kimchi’s lab (red lines are newly-revealed interactions) divulge the wealth of interconnections between two major cell death pathways
01.09.2014

A unique method of mapping protein interactions reveals how two cellular pathways are interconnected

(l-r) Dr. Zohar Mukamel, Zohar Shipony and Prof. Amos Tanay
21.07.2014

As the body’s cell divide and age, mistakes can pile up in the genome's "tags"

Without the c-Kit gene, colon cancer cells grow in a disorderly, aggregated manner and are invasive (A); when c-Kit expression is restored in these cells, they revert to a more normal organization (B)
15.09.2013

A cancer-causing gene can prevent the deadly spread of a tumor at a later point in malignancy

Where Lab and Clinic Meet- Dr. Ayelet Erez Work
02.09.2013

Dr. Ayelet Erez finds that clinical work and lab research are a powerful combination

The tips of two adult fruit fly testes, viewed under a confocal microscope, are filled with dividing germ cells (green). About one quarter of these germ cells die by an alternative death pathway called germ cell death (pink and red)
05.06.2013
A newly discovered cell-death pathway could help fight cancer
“Deregulation scores” of hundreds of brain tumor patients: Each row corresponds to a pathway (that is, a biochemical process), and each column to a sample taken from a patient. Every colored spot stands for a number – the value of the “deregulation score” of the corresponding pathway, as determined for a particular patient. Dark blue stands for the activity of the pathway in normal brain tissue, whereas dark red indicates a high level of deviation from normal behavior. The clearly distinct group of normal b
13.05.2013

A new approach to personalized cancer therapy profiles a tumor by its biological pathways

Pages