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Stem cell

Algorithm-generated comparisons among the genomes of cells from 450 tissue samples: The analysis revealed a striking similarity (red colors, upper right rectangle) in tRNA signatures among cancerous cells and healthy dividing cells, as well as a degree of similarity among the non-dividing cells (red colors, lower left rectangle), whereas no such similarity (blue) was found when dividing cells were compared with non-dividing ones
23.11.2014

Synonyms in the gene code spell differences in cell division

Embryonic stem cells (marked in green fluorescent protein) that should become sex cells, in which the gene encoding Utx is not present. Each column shows a gene needed for sex cell development (top row – marked in red, purple and orange). After 12 days (bottom row) the expression of the four genes has stopped and, rather than develop into sperm or ova, the stem cells die
28.08.2012

Weizmann scientists discover an enzyme that is crucial for turning back the development clock in cells

Stem cells (alkaline phosphatase staining) from the lab of Dr. Jacob Hanna
20.08.2012

When a critical step in stem cell differentiation goes awry, it can lead to cancer

Judging DNA by Its Cover
23.07.2012

A newly-discovered molecular mechanism might explain the link between stem cells and cancer
 

Top: Dr. Noa Chapal-Ilani and Yitzhak Reizel. Bottom: Drs. Rivka Adar and Shalev Itzkovitz, and Profs. Nava Dekel and Ehud Shapiro
15.05.2012

Tracing the lineages of cells resolves some outstanding questions in biology

The two faces of BID. When duty calls, it leaves the cell nucleus to initiate cell suicide. Illustration: Elite Avni
23.04.2012

How does one protein direct two different life-or-death activities in the cell?

Mouse cell lineage tree. Oocytes are in red, bone marrow stem cells in yellow, demonstrating that the two form separate clusters with only a distant relationship
23.02.2012

A new method is helping to resolve controversies and answer some open questions in biology. 

The adult stem cell unit: Niches are in red. Cap cells (barbed arrowhead) are tightly associated with germ-line stem cells (outlined). Germ-line stem cells carry a spherical organelle - a fusome - which is asymmetrically localized to the side of the cap cells (arrow). Once the stem cell divides, one daughter cell loses contact with the niche and differentiates (green). The fusome in a differentiating germ cell becomes branched (arrowhead)
18.12.2011

Nature has an ingenious method for orchestrating stem cell development.

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